Stress, Pandemics, and Resiliency

Resiliency

From Pam Feldman, LIMHP:

This article from the New York Times helps us to understand how resilience is important in how we deal with adversity.  We face troubling times and it is more important than ever to look for ways to bolster our ability to stay on course and manage through crises.  We have options of how we handle the many challenges that face us.  I hope this article encourages you to find ways to stay positive.

From the NY Times:

“… the tools common to resilient people are optimism (that is also realistic), a moral compass, religious or spiritual beliefs, cognitive and emotional flexibility, and social connectedness. The most resilient among us are people who generally don’t dwell on the negative, who look for opportunities that might exist even in the darkest times. During a quarantine, for example, a resilient person might decide it is a good time to start a meditation practice, take an online course or learn to play guitar.”

Access the full article here

How DBT Can Help You Get What You Want

In a world where communication is available at our fingertips in an instance true connection and communication appear to be lacking. We have social media, instant messaging, texting, screen shots, and all variety of digital screen-to-screen interactions. This can make face-to-face interaction feel more difficult or uncomfortable. Dialectical behavior therapy, also referred to as DBT, has a mnemonic device D-E-A-R M-A-N focusing on meeting an objective within a relationship. This skill was developed as a component of Interpersonal Effectiveness module to help remind people of the basic skills involved in asking for your needs to be met in a healthy manner. It is important in all of our relationships that we feel comfortable being capable of communicating our needs and expectations with others. Without open communication relationships can foster resentment, hurt feelings, and unmet needs. There is one caveat to asking others for what we want: even the most skilled communicators are not

Source: How DBT Can Help You Get What You Want | World of Psychology

Our Staff

Several staff members have extensive training and experience using DBT in their work — especially Kate Rist, MSW, LIMHP and Scarlett Shockley, RN-BC, MS, LPC, LIMHP.

Please contact us with your questions — 402-334-1122